Publicado
2023-12-16

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Alcántara Colin, J. ., Sandoval Cabrera, A. ., Martinez Quintero, D. A., & Santillán Benítez , J. G. . (2023). Chemodrug resistance: Cancer’s fight for survival. Nova, 21(41). https://doi.org/10.22490/24629448.7535
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Chemodrug resistance: Cancer’s fight for survival

DOI: https://doi.org/10.22490/24629448.7535
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Artículo de Revisión
Jafet Alcántara Colin https://orcid.org/0009-0005-2324-0597
Antonio Sandoval Cabrera https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3574-1231
Daniel Alejandro Martinez Quintero https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3574-1231
Jonnathan Guadalupe Santillán Benítez https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3574-1231

Introduction. Chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon implicated in all failed therapies and accounts for 90% of all cancer deaths and 30% of relapses. Objective. To understand the genetic mechanisms by which cancer cells acquire resistance to chemo drugs. Methodology. A non-systematic review study was carried out, in which genes and proteins involved in chemoresistance were searched using the terms “Cancer Drug resis- tance [Title/Abstract]”. From the articles obtained, highly involved genes, emerging genes, and proteins related to resistance were recognized. To obtain more specific information about genes, their interactions, and proteins associated with metabolism, the tools “The Human Protein Atlas”, “STRING CONSORTIUM 2022,” and The Small Molecule Pa- thway Database were used for their review. Results. From this review it was found that there are genes highly related to resistance such as: ABCA3, ABCB1, ABCB2, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG2, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, GSTA1. Recently recognised genes such as: FOXO3, FOXM1, Skp2, Snail, Twist1, ZEB1 and SLCO1B3. Conclusions. It is necessary to taking account new approaches related to cancer treatments considering chemoresistence and the genes related to the resistence.